Tibetan Grammar - First case 'ming tsam' - just the name

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WORK IN PROGRESS: the grammar articles are being edited for wiki publication. During editing, the content might be incomplete, out of sequence or even misleading. In the verb section the approach to explain Tibetan verbs is changed to that of the "three thematic relations: Theme, Location, and Agent" - there will be discrepancies to the other grammar section until they are matched with it

Template:Grammar articles (by Stefan J. Gueffroy[1] [fka Eckel])

ming tsam མིང་ཙམ་, Just the Name

Template:Tibetan Also called: nominative case, "no particle", accusative case, patient role particle "-Ø", rirst case. This case does not add any particle to the word or changes it any way.


Independent of Verb Type

Topic

Enumeration, Section Heading, Title

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Proleptic

Proleptic: anticipatory

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Temporal ming tsam

Temporal ming tsam can also be viewed as a very frequently omitted locative (la don) of time.

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In Compound Words

Note: See also "Formation of the Tibetan Words - Compounded Nouns".

Adjective/Verb - Adjective/Verb

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  • from: དགའ་བ་ adjective, noun, verb:

joyful, happy; joy; to be happy, glad, pleased, to take joy in

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Noun - Adjective

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Apposition

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Nouns in a List - Nominalized Clauses in a List

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Examples for Types of Verbs with an Argument in ming tsam

See: The Syntactic Verb Categories and Classification of Verbs According to Semantic and Syntactic Groups

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Exceptions are discussed in the verb section. E.g., see: (in The Syntactic Verb Categories) agentive directed, directed grammar with transitive verbs and (in Classification of Verbs According to Semantic and Syntactic Groups) Verbs Expressing Mental Activity with Directed Grammar, Verbs That Can Take a Referential ལ་ for Their Theme, Verbs of Benefit or Harm and Hindrance, Verbs Expressing "to Make Effort, to Engage In"

Linking Verb

linking verb, category: ming tsam intransitive - stative copula
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Intransitive Verbs

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Intransitive verbs like:

verbs of existence and possession

verbs of existence
verbs of existence, category: ming tsam intransitive - stative located Template:Grules

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verbs of possession
verbs of possession category: ming tsam intransitive - stative located
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non-volitional event verbs
non-volitional event verbs, category: ming tsam intransitive - dynamic non-volitional
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verbs of motion
verbs of motion, category: ming tsam intransitive - dynamic directed
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verbs of necessity
Tibetan Grammar - verbs#Verbs of Necessity category: ming tsam intransitive - stative located
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In Tibetan, the theme (subject) of the verb དགོས་པ་, to need, is that what is needed, it performs the action to be needed, (the "water" in the example). What or whom needs is the qualifier (the "sprouts").


Transitive Verbs

transitive verbs, category: agentive transitive

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Ditransitive Verbs

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Verbs of Absence and "Presence"

verbs of absence and presence, category: ming tsam intransitive - stative agentive, ming tsam intransitive - dynamic agentive, agentive transitive - agentive

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Endnotes

  1. recently adopted